1. Jacopo, Iannacci,
    2017,
  2. Frizzi, Marco; Vaccari, Alessandro; Dalpez, Stefano; Trentini, Dario; Knapp, Brunhilde; Fusari, Emiliano,
    Search and rescue system.
    2017,
  3. Danilo, Mascolo; Antonietta, Buosciolo; Giuseppe, Latessa; Georg, Pucker; Mher, Ghulinyan; Simone Di Marco,
    2017,
  4. Villosio, Claudia; Di Tommaso, Maria Laura; Grinza, Elena; Rossi, Maria Cristina; Piazzalunga, Daniela; Mantouvalou, Katerina; Caisl, Jakub.,
    2017
  5. Piazzalunga, Daniela,
    The paper investigates the gender wage gap among recently graduated people, controlling for job and academic variables and for the field of study, as women lag in highly remunerative majors. The raw gender gap in hourly wages is 5.6%. Although including academic variables and the field of study, on top of job-related variables, slightly reduces the unexplained gap, the latter still accounts for most of the total difference. Using quantile decomposition, the paper shows that the unexplained gap increases along the wage distribution, indicating a glass ceiling effect. Heterogeneities arise across fields of study: the largest total gap emerges in Law, Political-Social sciences, and Economics-Statistics. In most disciplines, there is a significant unexplained gap – from 3.3% (Medicine), to 8.7% (Law), up to 9.6% (Agriculture) – which constitutes the largest share of the difference, confirming that most of the wage gap remains unexplained also by major. Finally, I use geographical differences to explore the influence of institutional and macroeconomic variables, as well as of attitudes towards gender norms. Results indicate that childcare and part-time availability are correlated with lower gender wage gaps, while traditional gender norms are associated with higher gaps.,
    2017
  6. Piazzalunga, Daniela,
    This paper analyses the effects of different marital property regimes on the marriage-specific investments of the spouses. In particular, it provides an empirical assessment of the effects of a change from a separation property regime towards a more equal distribution of matrimonial assets on labour supply, housework time, and childcare, taking advantage of a decision by the English House of Lord in 2000. I use a difference-indifference approach, with individual fixed effects. Results show that married women reduced their labour supply by about 1.5-2.5 hours per week when the property regime is more favourable to them (slightly more if overtime is included). They didn’t change the number of hours devoted to housework, but the probability that they are mainly responsible for children increased by 5-9%. The results hide heterogeneities: as expected, the effects are significant for women in couples with higher level of assets and wealth (proxied by education), while no effect is found among low educated women.,
    2017
  7. Barone, Carlo; Schizzerotto, Antonio; Abbiati, Giovanni ; Assirelli Giulia,
    2017
  8. Jacopo Iannacci,
    2017
  9. Lecca, Michela; Da Pos, Osvaldo,
    Rubrica / Column,
    2017
  10. Gasparini, Leonardo; Bessire, Bänz; Unternährer, Manuel; Stefanov, André; Boiko, Dmitri; Perenzoni, Matteo; Stoppa, David,
    2017